Study Reveals Reach, Performance Of Instagram Reels Vs. TikTok Video Ads

Study Reveals Reach, Performance Of Instagram Reels Vs. TikTok Video Ads


How do TikTok and Facebook's Instagram Reels compare on paid advertising performance?

Ad-design platform Creatopy ran a study between Sept. 14 and Oct.5 testing similar campaigns on each platform.

The campaigns featured the same 15-second product presentation video, ad copy and landing page. Each had total spend of roughly $1,000 and targeted 25- to-44-year-olds with similar interests living in the United States.

Before running the study, Creatopy's staff unanimously hypothesized that due to its ability to drive engagement, TikTok would be victorious.

Instead, Instagram Reels completely outperformed TikTok.

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Wreckage of U.S. Revenue Cutter Found - Archaeology Magazine

Wreckage of U.S. Revenue Cutter Found - Archaeology Magazine

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Live Science reports that the wreckage of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear has been found in Canadian waters by the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other researcher groups. Although the wooden vessel has been badly damaged by fishing trawlers and strong currents, it still has the Bear’s distinctive “bow staples” for traveling through heavy ice in polar waters, according to Brad Barr of NOAA. Built as a commercial sealer in 1874, the ship was purchased by the U.S. government for rescue work in the Arctic in the 1880s. The vessel also served as a relief ship around Alaska during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, a floating museum in California, a film set in 1930 for The Sea-Wolf, and as a part of Admiral Richard Byrd’s Antarctic explorations. The Bear even patrolled Arctic waters for the U.S. Navy during both world wars, and helped capture a vessel being used by German military intelligence during World War II. The ship was decommissioned in 1944, and sank in a storm as it was towed to Philadelphia in 1963. Researchers have been looking for the ship since 1979, but its last location is now thought to have been misreported by its tow ship. To read about a shipwreck found deep in the Gulf of Mexico, go to "All Hands on Deck."

Original author: Esther
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MASSIVE GLOBAL REEF SURVEY RESULTS PUBLISHED

MASSIVE GLOBAL REEF SURVEY RESULTS PUBLISHED

A scientist surveying a coral reef in the Chagos Archipelago (Photo: Ken Marks/Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation)

DIVE Report

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) has published the findings from its Global Reef Expedition – the largest coral reef survey and mapping research mission in history. The Global Reef Expedition Final Report will provide scientists with 'valuable baseline data on the status of the world’s reefs' and offer 'key insights into how to save coral reefs in a rapidly changing world.'

Both natural and man-made factors have contributed to a precipitous decline in coral reefs as coastal development, pollution, disease, severe storms, and climate change have all impacted the health of coral reefs. As oceans continue to warm, and massive coral bleaching events occur with increasing frequency and severity, coral reefs are struggling to survive. Scientists estimate that half of the world’s coral reefs have been lost in the last 40 years. Coral reefs are clearly in crisis. How do we save the reefs that remain before it is too late?

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation embarked on the Global Reef Expedition to address this coral reef crisis. This research mission brought together hundreds of scientists from around the world to conduct tens of thousands of standardized scientific surveys at over 1,000 reefs in 16 countries. The Expedition travelled around the globe surveying and mapping coral reefs, from the Red Sea through the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans.

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Saegrass and oyster restoration project to benefit marine environment in Forth and tackle climate change

Saegrass and oyster restoration project to benefit marine environment in Forth and tackle climate change
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The £2.4 million project, Restoration Forth, will improve the local marine ecosystem and help to tackle climate change.

It kicks off just days before world leaders are due to gather in Glasgow for the United Nations climate summit COP26, which is seen as the most important international negotiations yet in the battle against environmental breakdown.

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Seagrass, often described as the ocean’s unsung hero, provides important habitat for marine life and is an efficient store for climate-warming carbon emissions.

Scientist Richard Lilley is one of the team working on a new £2.4 million project to restore seagrass and wild oyster populations in the Firth of Forth

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Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching

Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching


Detail of “Revolve” (2021), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 168 x 335 x 35 centimeters. All images © Courtney Mattison, shared with permission

Two new site-specific pieces by Courtney Mattison (previously) position ceramic sculptures of corals, sponges, and anemones in a swirling cluster of ocean diversity. Titled “Revolve” and “Our Changing Seas VII,” the wall reliefs are the latest additions to the Los Angeles-based artist’s body of work, which advocates for ecological preservation by highlighting the beauty and fragile nature of marine invertebrates.

In both installations, Mattison contrasts the vibrant, plump tentacles of healthy creatures with others sculpted in white porcelain to convey the devastating effects of the climate crisis, including widespread bleaching. Her recurring subject matter is becoming increasingly urgent, considering recent reports that estimate that 14 percent of the world’s coral population has been lost in the last decade alone.

Each of the lifeforms is hand-built and pocked with minuscule grooves and textured elements—she shares this meticulous process on Instagram—and once complete, the individual sculptures are assembled in sweeping compositions that radiate outward in shifting gradients. “Water connects us all, from the lush banks of Lawsons Fork Creek to the icy glaciers of the Arctic and glittering reefs of Southeast Asia. Life on Earth is dependent on healthy oceans,” she shares about “Revolve.” “The swirling design of this work is inspired by these connections and patterns, with revolving forms repeated in nature through hurricanes, seashells, ocean waves, and galaxies.”

Mattison’s solo exhibition Turn the Tide is on view at Highfield Hall & Gardens in Massachusetts through October 31 before it travels to the New Bedford Whaling Museum, where it will be through May 1, 2022. You explore a larger archive of the artist’s marine works on Behance and her site.

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Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching

Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching


Detail of “Revolve” (2021), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 168 x 335 x 35 centimeters. All images © Courtney Mattison, shared with permission

Two new site-specific pieces by Courtney Mattison (previously) position ceramic sculptures of corals, sponges, and anemones in a swirling cluster of ocean diversity. Titled “Revolve” and “Our Changing Seas VII,” the wall reliefs are the latest additions to the Los Angeles-based artist’s body of work, which advocates for ecological preservation by highlighting the beauty and fragile nature of marine invertebrates.

In both installations, Mattison contrasts the vibrant, plump tentacles of healthy creatures with others sculpted in white porcelain to convey the devastating effects of the climate crisis, including widespread bleaching. Her recurring subject matter is becoming increasingly urgent, considering recent reports that estimate that 14 percent of the world’s coral population has been lost in the last decade alone.

Each of the lifeforms is hand-built and pocked with minuscule grooves and textured elements—she shares this meticulous process on Instagram—and once complete, the individual sculptures are assembled in sweeping compositions that radiate outward in shifting gradients. “Water connects us all, from the lush banks of Lawsons Fork Creek to the icy glaciers of the Arctic and glittering reefs of Southeast Asia. Life on Earth is dependent on healthy oceans,” she shares about “Revolve.” “The swirling design of this work is inspired by these connections and patterns, with revolving forms repeated in nature through hurricanes, seashells, ocean waves, and galaxies.”

Mattison’s solo exhibition Turn the Tide is on view at Highfield Hall & Gardens in Massachusetts through October 31 before it travels to the New Bedford Whaling Museum, where it will be through May 1, 2022. You explore a larger archive of the artist’s marine works on Behance and her site.

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The easy way to delete Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp without losing anything

The easy way to delete Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp without losing anything
Want to get off Zuckerberg's apps? Here's how.
Original author: Science
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Electric robots are mapping the seafloor, Earth's last frontier

Electric robots are mapping the seafloor, Earth's last frontier

Getting a fuller picture would enable us to navigate ships more safely, create more accurate climate models, lay down telecommunication cables, build offshore windfarms and protect marine species -- all part of what's known as the "blue economy," projected to be worth $3 trillion by 2030.

Underwater robotic vehicles equipped with sensors are helping gather that data quicker and more cheaply than ever before. But many of these vehicles rely on batteries with a limited lifespan, and need to return to a boat or the shore to recharge, making it difficult for them to map more remote parts of the sea.

A five-year-old startup called Seatrec is rising to the challenge, founded by oceanographer Yi Chao. While working at NASA, he developed technology to power ocean robots by harnessing "the naturally occurring temperature difference" of the sea, Chao told CNN Business.

The power module can be installed on existing data-gathering robots or Seatrec's own floating device. This dives a kilometer down to examine the chemistry and shape of the seabed, using sonar to create a map of the surrounding area. The robot returns to the surface to send back its findings via satellite.

Seatrec's float uses differences in ocean temperature to power itself.

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Watch This UK Radio Host Terminate An Interview After Realizing He Made A Huge Mistake

Watch This UK Radio Host Terminate An Interview After Realizing He Made A Huge Mistake
Watch This UK Radio Host Terminate An Interview After Realizing He Made A Huge Mistake - Digg

FEELS LIKE A MONTY PYTHON SKIT

Clare Hymer 2 days ago

Radio host Mike Graham was interviewing Cameron Ford, a spokesperson for the climate change activist group Insulate Britain and attempted to nail him on hypocrisy but realized he made a goof.

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