Creative Design Turns a VW Bus Into a Luxury Pontoon Boat

Creative Design Turns a VW Bus Into a Luxury Pontoon Boat
If you’ve ever dreamed of dropping everything and taking an epic road trip across the country (and even if you haven’t), then you’ve likely encountered the concept of van life. The freedom of living on the open road has its appealing qualities, and it has blown up in popularity in recent years. …
Original author: Young
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World's largest aquarium nears completion in Abu Dhabi

World's largest aquarium nears completion in Abu Dhabi

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A massive marine park entering its final phase of construction in the United Arab Emirates will invite visitors to enjoy the world's largest indoor aquarium once completed sometime next year. SeaWorld Abu Dhabi will be home to tens of thousands of marine species across five levels, along with the dedicated research center to focus on their conservation.

Once finished on the tourism and leisure hotspot of Yas Island, SeaWorld Abu Dhabi will span 183,000 sq m (1,969,795 sq ft) of floorspace across its five indoor stories. Attractions will include interactive exhibits, an immersive ride detailing a visual journey from North Pole to South Pole, and what is billed as the largest aquarium in the world.

A render of "The Endless Vista" at SeaWorld Abu Dhabi Aquarium

PRNewsfoto/SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment,Miral

Filled with 25 million liters of water (6.6 million gal), the aquarium will be home to a whopping 68,000 marine animals including sharks, fish, manta rays and sea turtles. This may be best enjoyed through what is called the "Endless Vista," a 20-meter-tall (65-ft) vertical window spanning several levels with clear, towering views of all the action inside.

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A Photographer Marries the Worlds Above and Below the Water in a Single Frame | KQED

A Photographer Marries the Worlds Above and Below the Water in a Single Frame | KQED

Cathy Newman
NPR

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The ocean surface is the thinnest of lines between two worlds—"molecular thin"— underwater photographer David Doubilet calls it. Below is what Jacques Cousteau called "the silent world," a realm as alien as outer space with galaxies of fish and kaleidoscopic corals as spectacular as the burst of a supernova. Above lies the world of human habitation with the clang and clatter of cars, factories, and fishing fleets, all of which imperil the world below.

Doubilet has married those realms in Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea (Phaidon) to be published on November 3. The images, relating those "two worlds," are a particular passion made over a trajectory of 50 years of underwater photography for National Geographic. We spoke with Doubilet by phone. The interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

A hat tip to Jacques Cousteau who inspired you: "Civilization vanished with one last bow," he wrote of moving from the cacophony of the world above to the silence below. But you also brought your own experience to the worlds of air and water at an early age. You were 8-years-old when you asked your parents for a mask and fins...

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Best bluewater multihulls: Seawind 1370 and 1600 - Yachting World

Best bluewater multihulls: Seawind 1370 and 1600 - Yachting World

Among the increasing numbers of multihulls and catamarans designed for bluewater sailing comes the new Seawind 1370, which follows hot on the heels of the elegant Seawind 1600. Toby Hodges and François Tregouet take a look

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The first Seawind 1370 is not yet on the water, but comes with a strong heritage of bluewater multihull design.

For nearly four decades, the Australian Seawind brand and its founder Richard Ward has been gearing its catamarans around safe bluewater sailing, including performance, protection and ease of handling. Since purchasing Corsair trimarans in 2010 it has ramped up production and new model releases. 

Its Reichel Pugh-designed 1600, which launched three years ago, is an elegant looking cat with relatively low freeboard and some smart solutions for fast bluewater sailing.

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‘Becoming Cousteau’ Shows the Evolution of the Underwater Icon

‘Becoming Cousteau’ Shows the Evolution of the Underwater Icon

Like many people, Liz Garbus grew up watching the exploits of French underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau in his ship, the “Calypso.” But the filmmaker learned more than she ever knew while making her newest documentary, “Becoming Cousteau.” The National Geographic film, in theaters Oct. 22, chronicles the highs and lows of the adventurer’s life.

In a virtual Q&A with IndieWire Executive Editor and Chief Critic Eric Kohn as a part of the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, Garbus explained that she initially wanted to make a film about Cousteau after reading a children’s book with her son and realizing that there was a lot more to the explorer’s life than she knew.

“I grew up watching Cousteau and his happy ‘Calypso’ team of adventurers,” she said, “and it filled my head with all kinds of unachievable fantasies of sailing the world. But I knew nothing about what ultimately is his legacy, which is the education of a conservationist: That journey from that hubristic adventurer who we got to know as a television celebrity to a very deeply committed conservationist who was sounding the alarm on the climate emergency decades before it reached popular consciousness.”

Although Cousteau initially began his oceanic exploits as a machismo-driven conqueror, throughout the course of his career he realized the importance of conservation and the catastrophic effects of climate change.

Said Garbus, “That evolution from hubris and adventurer to protector is a metaphor for where we as a society need to go. So it’s not just … that nostalgic journey that fills us all with those endorphins and happy memories, but also something very, very timely for where we are today on this planet.”

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Wreckage of U.S. Revenue Cutter Found - Archaeology Magazine

Wreckage of U.S. Revenue Cutter Found - Archaeology Magazine

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Live Science reports that the wreckage of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear has been found in Canadian waters by the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other researcher groups. Although the wooden vessel has been badly damaged by fishing trawlers and strong currents, it still has the Bear’s distinctive “bow staples” for traveling through heavy ice in polar waters, according to Brad Barr of NOAA. Built as a commercial sealer in 1874, the ship was purchased by the U.S. government for rescue work in the Arctic in the 1880s. The vessel also served as a relief ship around Alaska during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, a floating museum in California, a film set in 1930 for The Sea-Wolf, and as a part of Admiral Richard Byrd’s Antarctic explorations. The Bear even patrolled Arctic waters for the U.S. Navy during both world wars, and helped capture a vessel being used by German military intelligence during World War II. The ship was decommissioned in 1944, and sank in a storm as it was towed to Philadelphia in 1963. Researchers have been looking for the ship since 1979, but its last location is now thought to have been misreported by its tow ship. To read about a shipwreck found deep in the Gulf of Mexico, go to "All Hands on Deck."

Original author: Esther
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Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching

Hundreds of Ceramic Marine Creatures Radiate in Gradients to Show the Effects of Coral Bleaching


Detail of “Revolve” (2021), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 168 x 335 x 35 centimeters. All images © Courtney Mattison, shared with permission

Two new site-specific pieces by Courtney Mattison (previously) position ceramic sculptures of corals, sponges, and anemones in a swirling cluster of ocean diversity. Titled “Revolve” and “Our Changing Seas VII,” the wall reliefs are the latest additions to the Los Angeles-based artist’s body of work, which advocates for ecological preservation by highlighting the beauty and fragile nature of marine invertebrates.

In both installations, Mattison contrasts the vibrant, plump tentacles of healthy creatures with others sculpted in white porcelain to convey the devastating effects of the climate crisis, including widespread bleaching. Her recurring subject matter is becoming increasingly urgent, considering recent reports that estimate that 14 percent of the world’s coral population has been lost in the last decade alone.

Each of the lifeforms is hand-built and pocked with minuscule grooves and textured elements—she shares this meticulous process on Instagram—and once complete, the individual sculptures are assembled in sweeping compositions that radiate outward in shifting gradients. “Water connects us all, from the lush banks of Lawsons Fork Creek to the icy glaciers of the Arctic and glittering reefs of Southeast Asia. Life on Earth is dependent on healthy oceans,” she shares about “Revolve.” “The swirling design of this work is inspired by these connections and patterns, with revolving forms repeated in nature through hurricanes, seashells, ocean waves, and galaxies.”

Mattison’s solo exhibition Turn the Tide is on view at Highfield Hall & Gardens in Massachusetts through October 31 before it travels to the New Bedford Whaling Museum, where it will be through May 1, 2022. You explore a larger archive of the artist’s marine works on Behance and her site.

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Ecuadorian Navy Sailing Ship Catches Low-Profile Narco Speedboat

Ecuadorian Navy Sailing Ship Catches Low-Profile Narco Speedboat

The tall sailing vessel Guayas captured the drug-smuggling boat and its crew during a highly unusual training voyage.

By Thomas Newdick October 25, 2021

Getty Images-Fernando Camino

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Morgan Maassen Releases Stunning New Teahupo'o Film, 'Goddesses'

Morgan Maassen Releases Stunning New Teahupo'o Film, 'Goddesses'

When Morgan Maassen was 20 years old, he went to Tahiti. He was there for a week on a lifestyle shoot, and something in the place resonated with him. It latched onto his soul, never to let go. “The mountains, sea, dense jungle and perfect waves made their case in a matter of seconds,” he said. “I was hooked, paving the way for me to return at every opportunity possible.”

Over the last decade, he’s returned as many times as he can. He still loves it there, and with each visit his love grows a little more. “Over the years of visiting what I’d reckon to be the most beautiful place in the world, I’ve also met some outstanding characters, forged by the power of their connection with the land and sea,” he said. “Recently, I’ve had the honor and pleasure of getting to know the Fierro family. Loving parents Andrew and Hina have raised three young women who are pushing women’s surfing while gracefully sharing their Tahitian lifestyle with the world.”

He made a film about the family, and in true Maassen fashion, it’s a piece of art. Beautifully shot and masterfully edited, Goddesses is an example of how good a surf film can be. “To visit them at their home, to spend time with the family, to explore nature and the sea with them, all the while chasing swells and watching these women charge bigger and bigger surf, has been utterly moving,” he said. “I am such a huge fan of these sisters, and the opportunity to point my lens at them as they live and grow was the thrill of a lifetime.”

Of course, since they’re surfers in Tahiti, Teahupo’o plays a large role in their lives, and Maassen focused on it. “Vahine, Heimiti, and Kohai exude the vibrancy of life, and do it together,” Maassen continued. “Their bond is nothing short of magic; these young women are woven into each other’s growth and success. Watching them knock on the door of Teahupo’o one-by-one, Vahine leading the way into some of the heaviest waves I’ve ever seen women surf, is enthralling.”

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